Meta fires several employees, security guards for 'hijacking user accounts': report

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Facebook and Instagram parent company Meta Platforms is cracking down after busting several employees and contracted security guards for exploiting an internal system used for resetting user accounts, firing two dozen workers over the past few years for allegedly "hijacking" accounts, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Facebook parent company Meta has fired dozens of employees and contracted security guards over the past few years for allegedly abusing its internal system for re-setting user accounts. (Reuters/Dado Ruvic/Illustration / Reuters Photos)

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Citing people familiar and internal documents, the Journal reported Thursday that Meta recently told its employees to stop using its Online Operations or "Oops" system — which is typically used to reset the accounts of friends, family, or VIPs whose accounts have been taken over — after its usage ramped up and several people were discovered abusing it.

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According to the outlet, some of the terminated Meta workers and contractors are even accused of accepting "thousands of dollars in bribes from outside hackers to access user accounts."

Several Meta employees have been fired for abusing an internal system that allows re-setting user accounts on the company’s platforms, including Facebook and Instagram. ((AP Photo/Jenny Kane, file) / AP Images)

The security guards implicated for alleged wrongdoing were not actual Meta employees, but worked for a contractor, Allied Universal. The contract employees are granted access to Oops as part of their onboarding. 

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A spokesperson for Allied told the Journal in a statement that the company "takes seriously all reports of violations of our standards of conduct."

Meta’s logo sign is seen at the company headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., on, Oct. 28, 2021.  ((AP Photo/Tony Avelar, File / AP Images)

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"Individuals selling fraudulent services are always targeting online platforms, including ours, and adapting their tactics in response to the detection methods that are commonly used across the industry," Meta spokesman Andy Stone told the outlet, adding that the company "will keep taking appropriate action against those involved in these kinds of schemes."

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