Carer’s Allowance payments to rise by 3.1% – check on your eligibility now

Care: Research shows a quarter of UK adults are carers

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Carer’s Allowance income will rise by 3.1 percent in April, taking the payments from £67.60 per week to around £69.70. Additionally, the new earnings limit for Carer’s Allowance will also go up to align with inflation which Carers UK estimated will put it at between £128 to £132 per week.

To be eligible for Carer’s Allowance, claimants will need to provide care for someone for at least 35 hours a week. The person they’re caring for must also be claiming certain benefits such as PIP.

Claimants do not have to be related to, or live with, the person they care for.

Additionally, claimants will not be paid extra if they care for more than one person.

If someone else also cares for the same person as the claimant, only one of them can get Carer’s Allowance.

The type of care needed to be eligible for Carer’s Allowance can also vary. Eligible care can include helping with washing and cooking, taking the person they care for to a doctor’s appointment or helping with household tasks, like managing bills and shopping.

Additionally, claimants must be aged 16 or over to be eligible for Carer’s Allowance. They must also have been in England, Scotland or Wales for at least two of the last three years.

While claimants can be employed, they must not be in full-time education, be subject to immigration control or have earnings of £128 or more a week after tax, National Insurance and expenses.

It may be possible to get Carer’s Allowance and state pensions at the same time but the income awarded will be reduced.

It is not possible to get the full amount of both Carer’s Allowance and a state pension at the same time.

If a claimants pension is £67.60 a week or more, they will not get a Carer’s Allowance payment.

If their pension is less than £67.60 a week, they’ll get a Carer’s Allowance payment to make up the difference.

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Carer’s Allowance can affect the other benefits that both the claimant and the person being cared for gets.

When a person claims Carer’s Allowance, the person they care for will stop getting a severe disability premium paid with their benefits and an extra amount for severe disability paid with Pension Credit, if they get one.

They may also stop getting reduced Council Tax and claimants will need to contact their local authority to find out if they’re affected.

For the claimant, their other benefit payments may change, but their total benefit payments will usually either go up or stay the same.

It should be noted Carer’s Allowance does not count towards the benefit cap.

Claims for Carer’s Allowance can be made online through the Government’s website or through the post.

Before applying, claimants will need to have certain information at the ready. This includes their National Insurance number and bank details.

They will also need the details of the person they’re caring for. Specifically, they will need their date of birth and address, National Insurance number if they’re 16 or over or their Disability Living Allowance reference if they’re under 16.

Carer’s Allowance claims can be backdated by up to three months.

When receiving Carer’s Allowance, claimants must keep the Government updated with any changes in their circumstance.

This can include starting a job, starting or ending full-time education or seeing changes to their income levels.

This is important to note as claimants may be issued with a penalty or be taken to court if they give wrong information or do not report a change quickly enough.

Claimants will also need to repay money to the DWP if they have been paid too much.

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