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Look, we know it’s extremely tempting to reach for your fourth cup of coffee…an energy drink…or literally any form of caffeine when you’re trying to wake yourself up in the morning, but there are so many better ways to get there (and they involve eating!!!).

“From an energy perspective… if an individual experiences poor energy in the morning and is skipping breakfast (perhaps just in favour of coffee – very common) and then diving into an unhealthy option mid morning / lunch or overeating at the next meal then I would encourage making breakfast a feature in the morning instead,” explains accredited nutritionist and Healthy Care partner Jacqueline Alwill. “It doesn’t have to be a banquet, make it simple, if needed keep the portion small and focus on the nutrients / foods / recipes mentioned. Be consistent with this approach, prednisone kidney stones tracking shifts in energy levels over a series of 4+ weeks rather than giving up after a few days. The body needs time to adjust to change.”

To find out more about how to best fuel our bodies, Jacqueline broke down the foods you should, and shouldn’t be, eating in the AM.

 

Foods that are great for morning energy

Fibre rich foods such as rolled oats in wholesome baked oats/porridge, whole fruit teamed with healthy fats and protein (greek / natural yoghurt, chopped nuts and seeds and fresh seasonal fruit) and vegetables added to your eggs / tofu.

Fibre rich foods fuels the beneficial bacteria in our gut responsible for energy production, satiate our appetite for longer and help to maintain steady blood glucose levels for the morning and throughout the day.

Magnesium rich foods including dark leafy green vegetables such as spinach, nuts and seeds in particular pumpkin seeds, almonds and cashews, legumes such as black beans or including a magnesium supplement such as Healthy Care’s Super Magnesium in your smoothie or during breakfast to boost magnesium intake at the start of the day.

Magnesium is an important cofactor and stimulator of enzymes in the energy production pathway yet a mineral easily depleted by exercise, stress and caffeine. Increasing magnesium intake through diet and supplementation can support energy, sleep and nervous system overall. When it comes to supplementation, the quality and source is important. Brands such as Healthy Care Vitamins are made on Sydney’s northern beaches (love local!) with a focus on high quality nutrients in all their supplements.

LOW GI whole foods balanced by a source of protein and healthy fats such as egg and cottage cheese roll ups, smashed avocado on wholegrain bread, Collagen boosting almond muffins with chia jam. Not only will you keep GI low with these muffins in particular but you’ll also boost collagen intake with the incorporation of Healthy Care’s Bioactive Collagen Powder into the recipe to maintain skin hydration and support collagen formation – a boost of energy and skin loving ingredients to start your day! 

Low GI foods and lowering the glycaemic load of a meal can help to balance and lower blood sugar levels, sustain energy for longer and maintain healthy weight.

Foods to avoid in the morning

High sugar foods e.g. commercial banana bread / cake, highly processed breakfast cereals, fruit juice, sugar sweetened yoghurt. These cause immediate spikes in blood glucose and energy levels but then very fast declines as well which can lead to low energy soon after eating.

Breakfast recipes to boost your energy

PBJ smoothie with HC Magnesium Powder

Serves 1 as a meal or split by 2 for an easy snack on the go

Gluten free : Vegetarian

1 1/2 cups water

1 teaspoon HEALTHY CARE SUPER MAGNESIUM POWDER

1 frozen banana

1/2 cup frozen raspberries

1/2 cup frozen strawberries

1 small (70g) cooked beetroot

1 tablespoon cottage cheese

1 1/2 tablespoons chia seeds

1 teaspoon all natural (no added vegetable oils or sugar) peanut butter

1 extra teaspoon peanut butter for the the glass (optional)

Place all ingredients in blender and blitz until smooth.

Spread extra teaspoon of peanut butter around your glass (if desired), pour smoothie ingredients in and enjoy!

Orange almond muffins with strawberry chia jam

Gluten free : Dairy Free Makes 9 muffins + 1 cup jam

Muffins:

4 free range eggs

3 tablespoons (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

1/3 cup (85ml) maple syrup

2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest

3 tablespoons HEALTHY CARE COLLAGEN POWDER

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon baking powder (gluten free)

pinch sea salt

2 cups (250g) almond meal

Strawberry chia jam:

1 cup fresh or frozen + defrosted strawberries

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1-2 tablespoons chia seeds

MAKE THE JAM:

Place strawberries, orange zest and vanilla in a small saucepan on medium heat.

As the strawberries warm, use a fork and mash them around the saucepan to break them up and release juices, mash them to a consistency you would like to eat them as a jam.

Remove from heat and add chia seeds – if using fresh strawberries add 1 – 1.5 tablespoons if using frozen and defrosted strawberries use 2 tablespoons.

Mix together and set aside to cool, set and become a healthier take on jam.

MAKE THE MUFFINS:

Heat oven to 175C and grease or line 9x 1/2 cup muffin tin with oil or patty cake wrappers.

In a large mixing bowl whisk together eggs, oil, maple and zest.

Add HEALTHY CARE COLLAGEN POWDER, cinnamon, baking powder, salt and almond meal and mix with a wooden spoon.

Divide between the 9 muffin cases and place in oven to bake for 16-18 minutes (check the top of the muffin springs back when gently touched).

Cool in tin for 15 minutes then transfer to a wire rack.

Slice and top with chia jam for a delicious collagen boosting breakfast or snack!

More recipes:

Avo on sweet potato bread

Egg cottage cheese roll up

Baked zucchini and apple oats with walnut topping

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